#TOTW (from 22-07-2014): ‘Wireless monitor ‘relieves pressure’ on nursing staff’

Afternoon all!

A technology-based #TOTW this time round:

‘Wireless monitor ‘relieves pressure’ on nursing staff’ via

Basically, it’s a small device incorporated into a patch that is stuck on the patient’s chest to monitor blood pressure, temperature and heart rate.

“A study in the British Medical Journal in 2012 concluded that nearly 12,000 deaths in hospitals in England had been preventable. It said clinical monitoring had been a problem in nearly a third of these deaths. Independent experts say we are witnessing the start of a revolution in wearable technology, with great potential benefits in healthcare.”

I don’t really have a great deal to say other than I wanted to take the opportunity to put this out there again, and that I think it sounds like a great idea. Concerns have been raised over their use and it’s been argued that there is no substitute for having sufficient levels of nursing staff on a ward, but these are not to replace staff, merely to help existing staff focus more on their patients.

Dr Peter Carter of the Royal College of Nursing said new technology could be very helpful in alerting nurses and doctors to a patient who was starting to deteriorate – but he also expressed a note of caution. “Anything which helps that process has to be a good thing,” he said. “However, we also know that there is no substitute for having enough staff with the right level of skill on every ward, able to give each and every patient the care and attention that critically ill people need.”

Apparently, the British manufacturers of the device are looking into developing the patch to enable it to also monitor a patient’s oxygen levels, this making it even more useful.

Take a look – this is a good news story! 😀

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