#TOTW (from 10-07-2014): ‘Alzheimer’s research in ‘major step’ towards blood test’

This last week has seen yet more stories about assisted dying and people coming out in favour of, or arguing against it. However, as I blogged about this last weekend, I have decided to go with the week’s other big news story as far as I could see, and that was the announcement of a blood test that has been developed in order to help in the battle against Alzheimer’s. This week’s #TOTW is therefore:

Alzheimer’s research in ‘major step’ towards blood test via

Another link I tweeted was also related to the above tweet and is also worth taking a look at:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/elderhealth/10954378/Alzheimers-Simple-blood-test-could-speed-up-diagnosis.html

Dr Eric Karran, director of research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, described the study as a “technical tour de force”. However, he warned the current accuracy levels risked telling healthy people they were on course to develop Alzheimer’s which may lead to anxiety and depression. However, Dr Karran did argue this was a step towards making Alzheimer’s a preventable disease.

“I think it does, but not immediately. This gives a better way to identify people who will progress to Alzheimer’s disease, people who can be entered into clinical trials earlier, I think that will increase the potential of a positive drug effect and thereby I think we will get to a therapy, which will be an absolute breakthrough if we can get there.”

Although this announcement is just one of many that seem to be made about the battle against this horrific disease, I feel it marks an important step. Although scientists have a long way to go, this blood test demonstrates the value of research in finding a way to tackle dementia, in all it’s forms. This should give us the hope that with more investment in research and with continued effort from the scientific community along with support from Government and other interested organisations, that maybe one day, whether it be in 10, 15 or 20 years time that we may find a way of detecting signs of the disease early enough to prevent it from causing further damage, and maybe even one day to find a cure.

We can but hope.

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