Anatomy lectures by Professor Marian Diamond

Professor Marian Diamond *IS* a legend – FACT!

If you want to learn anything about human anatomy, then this is most certainly the lady to teach you! With her extremely infectious enthusiasm for the subject, you can push your textbooks to one side and watch nearly 40 hours (although I would advise not back-to-back!) of good old-fashioned teaching:

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Marian-Diamond-anatomy-professor-a-YouTube-hit-2527209.php

I watched all 40 of her lectures whilst studying anatomy in the second year of my degree in Diagnostic Radiography. This is an invaluable resource for students of anatomy and also for those simply interested in the subject. All the lectures are from ‘Integrative Biology 131’ (2005) and were uploaded to YouTube by the University of California, Berkeley on August 20, 2007.

I challenge you to watch them and not to be carried away by her enthusiasm and love of the subject! Links to all 40 lectures are provided below in number order:

 

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 01: Organization of Body

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 02: Skeletal System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 03: Skeletal System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 04: Skeletal System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 05: Skeletal System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 06: Skeletal System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 07: Skeletal System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 08: Skeletal/Muscular System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 09: Muscular System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 10: Muscular System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 11: Muscular System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 12: Hematology

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 13: Hematology

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 14: Hematology/Cardiology

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 15: Cardiology

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 16: Blood Vascular System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 17: Blood Vascular System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 18: Lymphatic System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 19: Respiratory System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 20: Review

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 21: Respiratory System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 22: Neurohistology

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 23: Neurohistology/Development of Nervous System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 24: Development of Nervous System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 25: Spinal Cord and Nerves

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 26: Peripheral Nerves

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 27: Sensory and Motor Pathways

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 28: Motor Pathways and Forebrain

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 29: Forebrain

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 30: Eye

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 31: Review

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 32: Digestive System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 33: Digestive System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 34: Digestive/Urinary System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 35: Urinary System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 36: Endocrine System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 37: Endocrine System/Female Reproductive System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 38: Female Reproductive System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 39: Male Reproductive System

Integrative Biology 131 – Lecture 40: Integumentary System

#hellomynameis…

This is taken from http://drkategranger.wordpress.com/2013/09/04/hellomynameis/ (Posted on September 4th, 2013)

I was recently a hospital in-patient with post-operative sepsis following a stent exchange procedure. During this admission I made some observations on the quality of my care. Perhaps the starkest of these was that not every member of staff who approached me introduced themselves. We have it drilled into us on day 1 of Clinical Medicine learning that starting the relationship with a patient begins with an introduction. It was easy marks in our exams. I’m sure it is the same for nursing and other healthcare professionals too. But something has failed…

As a healthcare professional you know so much about your patient. You know their name, their personal details, their health conditions, who they live with and much more. What do we as patients know about our healthcare professionals? The answer is often absolutely nothing, sometimes it seems not even their names. The balance of power is very one-sided in favour of the healthcare professional.

I have always been a strong believer in getting to know people’s names as part of building good working relationships with both patients and other colleagues. I think it is the first rung on the ladder to providing compassionate care and often getting the simple things right, means the more complex things will follow more easily and naturally.

So here the idea of #hellomynameis is born. If you support this idea please leave a comment below with your introduction to a patient. By doing this you are pledging to introduce yourself to every patient you meet. Please share this page with as many healthcare professionals as possible and let’s make things better… The NHS employs 1.7 million people. The majority of these people will interact with patients on some level. Let’s see how many pledges we can get!

Here is mine to get us started:

“Hello. My name is Dr Kate Granger. I’m one of the senior doctors who will be looking after you on the ward while you’re with us. How are you feeling today?”


So, come on everybody. It’s not that difficult. Not only is it our professional responsibility to introduce ourselves to our patients, I believe it is simply the right thing to do. If you don’t do it already, then PLEASE START TODAY! This is how I intoduce myself:

“Hello. My name is Ben. I’m one of the radiographers and I’ll be taking your X-rays today if that’s alright?”

#TTT #14TW and #TOTW – What do they all mean?

Since creating my blog, I haven’t really had the opportunity to start blogging :-/ I have, however, been tweeting profusely – as you may have noticed! I have introduced a few regular “slots” in my tweeting schedule and I thought it might be a good idea to give a short explanation here of what they all are:

  • #TTT or ‘TED Talk Tuesday’

This was the first of the slots I created in order to be able to share with you a TED Talk (relating to the fields of medicine, healthcare, science and such like) each and every Tuesday.

  • #14TW or ‘One For The Weekend’

The second of the regular slots is an opportunity for me to share with you something totally unrelated to the subject matters of my regular tweets. It could be either an article, video, audio, or anything that is of interest to me, and hopefully to you too! It’s meant for a bit of fun and will give you an idea of the things that interest me outside of my profession. Most likely to be posted on a Friday or a Saturday.

  • #TOTW or ‘Tweet Of The Week’

The latest (and probably the last) of my regular weekly tweets is the chance for me to share again with you the tweet which for me was the highlight of my week, for one reason or another. This will be posted on a Sunday.